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UK Against Fluoridation

Thursday, July 20, 2006

Still 1 in 5 have dental decay and how many thyroid problems, bone fractures and malignancies.

He argued that fluoride should be added to drinking water in the most deprived communities. In Birmingham, where fluoridation was adopted, only around one in five 11-year-olds have tooth decay.The Scottish study found children in primary seven have on average 2.73 teeth which are decayed, missing or filled and 47% showed signs of obvious decay in their permanent (or second) teeth.Overall, the proportion of primary seven children in 2005 with no obvious decay is 53%. The Scottish Executive has set a target of 60% for 2010 and six of the 14 health boards surveyed have reached or exceeded the target.Dr Lamb said: "We do know one of the simplest and most efficient and cost-effective ways of improving oral health in children would be to put fluoride in the water."The BDA's policy is to support water fluoridation, which is targeted at communities which are most in need of it, but following consultation with the community."Mr Lamb said: "It is well known that there is a shortage of dentists in Scotland and many are unable to access dental care because of it."The association has long called for a tripling of investment in dentistry."The BDA's calls for a new campaign were echoed by Christine Grahame MSP, SNP social justice spokeswoman.She said: "The figures indicate a clear gap between rich and poor when it comes to oral health and we require a dedicated campaign not only in terms of more preventative information but backed up with real resources."One of the authors of the report, Martyn Merrett, chairman of the Scottish Dental Epidemiological Co-ordinating Committee, said: "[The report] shows that a large amount of dental disease is concentrated in a small number of children and we need to concentrate our efforts to help improve their dental health."Lewis Macdonald, Deputy Health Minister, said the figures were "encouraging". He pointed to the executive's free toothpaste and toothbrushes for children under 12 months and free fruit and water for primary one and two children and said: "We believe that these measures will mean that a child born in Scotland today will have a brighter future for oral health than any previous generation."
Children living in deprived communities of Scotland are twice as likely to suffer from tooth decay as those in wealthier areas, according to a study.National research found that 64% of children in the most deprived areas of Scotland had had decay in permanent teeth by primary seven age.That compares with only 30% of children in the wealthiest parts of Scotland, according to the National Dental Inspection Programme 2005.The first comprehensive study of the primary seven age group examined 10,794 children across Scotland, excluding the Western Isles, during the school year 2004 to 2005.The findings prompted the British Dental Association to call for a campaign to target greater resources and information at poorer communities.Dr Andrew Lamb, British Dental Association director for Scotland, said: "I think what is required is an education programme to encourage those parents who are currently not seeking dental advice for their children to seek dental advice."He argued that fluoride should be added to drinking water in the most deprived communities. In Birmingham, where fluoridation was adopted, only around one in five 11-year-olds have tooth decay.The Scottish study found children in primary seven have on average 2.73 teeth which are decayed, missing or filled and 47% showed signs of obvious decay in their permanent (or second) teeth.

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